Nokia Partner With Disney On VR Film Making - futurestuffs.com

Nokia Partner With Disney On VR Film Making

The partnership, which includes enabling Disney filmmakers to use the Ozo camera to create 360-degree virtual reality films, was announced by Nokia. So Nokia Partner With Disney On VR Film Making with the help of Ozo camera.

Nokia Partner With Disney On VR Film Making - futurestuffs.com

That flow of content has already begun, with Disney using the Ozo for two recent pieces as part of the promotional campaign for The Jungle Book. One brought viewers into a 360-degree roundtable interview with director Jon Favreau, the film’s cast, and moderator Chris Hardwick, while another planted them on the red carpet of the film’s Los Angeles premiere. While those kind of straightforward uses serve as decent proofs-of-concept, Nokia Technologies president Ramzi Haidamus stresses that they’re just the beginning, with the deal also covering the other studios that Disney owns like Marvel and Lucasfilm. That means the Ozo could potentially show up being used for 360-degree VR content for Star Wars,Marvel, and Pixar properties.

Nokia Partner With Disney On VR Film Making

Nokia Partner With Disney On VR Film Making - futurestuffs.com

The $60,000 Nokia Ozo camera was unveiled last November. It was designed to help pioneering filmmakers create new content for virtual reality headsets, but it was also designed to be relatively small, light, and inexpensive compared to most film-style cameras.

Nokia Partner With Disney On VR Film Making

Nokia Partner With Disney On VR Film Making - futurestuffs.com

he $60,000 Nokia Ozo is meant for amateur and professional filmmakers that are serious about making virtual reality content.

The camera itself is sleek, and it only weighs 9.3 pounds.

Aside from filming, you can also continuously stream from the Ozo for live broadcasts in virtual reality.

Audio plays a key role in making immersive VR experiences. Nokia’s Ozo offers 3D audio support that perfectly syncs with the 360º video so the images and sound feel real.

All the video and audio data from the Ozo is stored in a single video file, with only one output cable.

Thanks to a single cartridge for power and memory, the Ozo can film and stream wirelessly anywhere even from a drone.

Typical VR cameras film all the images separately and editing software digitally stitches everything together afterwards. In other words, filmmakers don’t know how the VR experience will look until they stop shooting.

Nokia’s Ozo overcomes this filming issue with “dynamic rendering,” which lets filmmakers wear a VR headset and watch what the Ozo is capturing in real-time, with a full 360-degree field of view.

Despite its new deal with Disney, Nokia says it wants to make Ozo accessible to non-filmmakers as well. It’s considering the idea of letting people rent basic Ozo cameras for quick shoots.